Raw Power and Refreshing Simplicity

2012 Ford Mustang GT Convertible Review

2012 Ford Mustang GT Convertible Review
The difference is under the hood. That’s where you’ll find 412 raw horsepower speaking loudly to anyone that’ll listen. It’s not a quiet steed, nor is it docile, but it’s a tremendously rewarding pony for those with a lust for performance and a heart for nostalgia.

Modern retro fun
The latest generation of the Mustang is, in my view, a fabulous piece of retro modernity. The vehicle really captures the spirit and excitement of the muscle car era; an era that is fondly remembered by many—myself included.

The latest generation of the Mustang is, in my view, a fabulous piece of retro modernity. (Photo: Rob Rothwell/Auto123.com)

Although my right to drive didn’t arrive until 1974, I was exposed to the muscle car era by older brothers who owned such classics as a 1970 Dodge Challenger R/T and a 1966 Plymouth Satellite. Both of these Mopar sleds were powered by Chrysler’s 383-cu-inch V8 backed by 4-speed sticks—the Challenger flaunting its “pistol grip” stick shift.

My point in reminiscing is to set the stage for driving the 2012 Mustang GT Convertible. It’s a fine rendition of all that made the early muscle car era so special. Despite its constellation of airbags and modern vehicle stability/safety accoutrements, my tester’s retro-spirit wasn’t dampened with the presence of a modern navigation system or other in-car tech toys.

Except for Ford’s discreet SYNC system, the 2012 GT ragtop I drove this week fulfilled my desires with simplicity, such as its knobs to control audio and climate functions. The presence of conventional switchgear and full instrumentation was a refreshing find, and frankly, I wouldn’t want it any other way in this sort of car.

I also wouldn’t want to change what’s under the hood.

5.0 litres of fun
The GT’s 5.0-litre, 32-valve V8 powerplant produces its height of 412 horsepower @ 6,500 rpm. This huge herd of hooves is complemented by 390 pound-feet of torque @ 4,250 rpm, the sum of which flows through a six-speed gearbox—automatic or manual. In my case, manual, thank you.

The presence of conventional switchgear and full instrumentation was a refreshing find. (Photo: Rob Rothwell/Auto123.com)

By Rob Rothwell,

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