2007 Hyundai Veracruz Limited Review

By Marc Bouchard
2007 Hyundai Veracruz Limited Review

Summary Rating: 75%

Styling

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Accessories

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Space and Access

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Comfort

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Performance

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Driving Dynamics

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Safety

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General Appreciation

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Hyundai sees big, and I'm not merely talking about sales. After enjoying much success in the compact SUV market, the Korean automaker now takes on larger, more upscale utility vehicles. The first strike came a couple of months ago with the introduction of the all-new Veracruz full-size crossover.

The Veracruz marks Hyundai's first foray into the full-size crossover segment.

Let's make things clear right off the bat: the Veracruz is unlike anything that ever came out of Hyundai's assembly lines. In terms of pricing, for example, never has the company sold such an expensive vehicle (from $39,900 to $45,900, without options). Therefore, buyers will have to make a leap of faith when they go to their local Hyundai dealer to test-drive the Veracruz. But considering how value-minded this manufacturer is, those who will step inside are likely to be quite surprised.

Uncompromised luxury
You're probably laughing your heart out by now: a "premium" vehicle from Hyundai does not fit in with what we're used to. Yet, this ain't a joke. The list of features offered with the Veracruz is so extensive that there's not even a "base" model per se. The least expensive trim level is called GLS and includes, among other things, heated leather seats, on-demand all-wheel drive with lock (50/50), a fully independent suspension with upgraded stabilizer bars, standard Electronic Stability Control, Traction Control, ABS brakes with Electronic Brakeforce Distribution and, of course, audio controls on the steering wheel.

Unique powertrain
Under the hood is a 3.8L V6 producing 260 horsepower, which is more than enough to propel this heavy mass. I have to say that the 6-speed automatic transmission operates flawlessly and swiftly whenever the urge to accelerate arises. From a driver's perspective, shifts are seamless.

Thusly equipped, the Veracruz can tow up to 3,500 pounds, making it one of the strongest crossovers in its class. The abundance of mid-range torque allows you to exploit the entire powerband without any difficulty. On the beautiful roads of Vancouver Island, I clocked the Veracruz at 9.3 seconds from 0 to 100 km/h.

The lone powertrain option is a 3.8L V6 mated to a 6-speed automatic transmission.

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