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2011 Nissan Rogue SV AWD Review

When Nissan decided to unleash the Rogue in 2008 (in North America, at any rate, as it had been around elsewhere for a while), it was mostly to replace the X-Trail. The X-Trail was the quintessential SUV: squarish good looks, delusions of pickup truck grandeur, slightly stiff ride.

The unique and contemporary profile of the Rogue, clearly inspired from the Murano, and its sedan-like road manners, broke neatly with its predecessor. And judging by its popularity, and let’s not forget its driving dynamics, the Nissan Rogue has established itself as one of the stars of the Nissan cast.

The Rogue’s profile, which in the beginning didn’t seem like it would age well at all, has finally emerged as contemporary and managed to retain its flair over the years. (Photo: Rob Rothwell/Auto123.com)

A Mona Lisa Smile
A bit like its big brother, the Murano, the Rogue greets you with a smiling face. Though the smile is more discrete, it’s still eminently noticeable and very attractive from the front.

Nissan tweaked it a bit for 2011, a very small bit actually, and not enough to erase the visage that characterizes it. Yes, the Rogue sports an extremely distinctive style indeed. The rounded and slightly elevated croup gives it a modern and unique twist.

In fact, the Rogue’s profile, which in the beginning didn’t seem like it would age well at all, has finally emerged as contemporary and managed to retain its flair over the years. Oh yes, and though we’re talking about a diminutive crossover here, the Rogue is still one of the beefiest offerings in its class.

In the image of the body, the cabin is a study of style and function. The big, T-shaped steering wheel is unmistakably Nissan, offering an excellent grip – and a plethora of redundant controls.

The curvy centre console and air vents create a homogenous ensemble, though truly not as stylish as we would have hoped. After all, the Rogue has its own unique charm, and we would’ve liked to see a little more original thinking inside. This is, of course, a question of taste.

The curvy centre console and air vents create a homogenous ensemble. (Photo: Rob Rothwell/Auto123.com)