Auto123.com - Helping you drive happy

2010 Honda Accord Crosstour First Impressions

Quality car insurance coverage, at competitive prices.
Ask for a car insurance quote today.
GET AN ONLINE CAR INSURANCE QUOTE
Malton, Ontario — Even if they need the room, North Americans tend not to opt for minivans and station wagons. At the same time, this group seems instinctively drawn to all-wheel drive. Not too long ago these customers gravitated to SUVs. Now they’re driving crossovers.

Net result: the industry is “crossovering” everything in sight…

There is no doubt that Crosstour’s exterior design is unique.

Targeting empty nesters
These forces have created the 2010 Honda Accord Crosstour. It has a very specific target audience: 50-year-old and plus empty nesters who need room and utility, but covet sedan-like ride and handling. They also desire a “premium” product, which is just one rung below “entry luxury.”

Families with kids at home aren’t even allowed to buy Crosstours.

Actually that’s not true, but Honda doesn’t expect many to consider the Crosstour; it’s too expensive for younger and smaller families, who like the CRV, and for larger and more affluent families, the 8-seater Honda Pilot awaits.

“This vehicle allows Honda customers to stay in the family, as they change their lifestyle,” noted Ryan Kelly, Manager, Product Planning, Honda Canada.

Design statement

There is no doubt that Crosstour’s exterior design is unique. Crossovers are defined somewhat loosely as SUVs based on car platforms. The Crosstour, more than any crossover on the market, looks like the car it was based on — the Accord.

The objective was a coupe-like profile that still yields lots of rear headroom and cargo space.

Styling is a subjective thing, so please make up your own minds. But to these eyes, the sleekness of the front half seems at odds with the largeness of the rear half.

Good Accord bones
The Accord platform is quite new, chock full of safety advances, and well suited for crossover duty, as it is quite stiff, with a high component of high-tensile steel (46 percent).

It also features versions of Honda’s well-regarded double wishbone front suspension and multi-link rear suspension.

Exclusive Crosstour features include front shocks with internal rebound springs (a Honda first), and a steering system with a constant gear ratio (versus the Accord’s variable steering ratio).

It also features versions of Honda’s well-regarded double wishbone front suspension and multi-link rear suspension.